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How to install and configure Mageia 8 on your Raspberry Pi board

Raspberry Pi 4 aka RPi4 board

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This instructions are tested on RPi4 board and might be adjusted for other Raspberry Pi boards like RPi3.

  1. First you should choose your image for your Desktop Environment which you can change/install later if needed. Note that there are only 64 bit images currently available but you can build your own with our scripts.
  2. Then you can use IsoDumper_Writing_ISO_images_on_USB_sticks IsoDumper IsoDumper or any other tool for writing the image on your SD card. Note that you need to extract it first if your tool doesn't support compressed images.
  3. After successful write you just boot your RPi4 board from SD card. It's very easy if you connect the board to the monitor or TV and keyboard especially if already installed Mageia on a regular computer. Headless install is also possible but it's not covered here.
  4. The Mageia install should boot to the Desktop Environment of your chosen image or command line interface aka CLI if that was your choice.
  5. Before you install or update any packages make sure that the repositories are for Mageia 8 (note bug 28818) and those that you prefer (mandatory is core one, others are of course optional: nonfree, tainted and backports).

It's very easy with MCC (see documentation and in CLI too (see bellow).


Please be aware that although this can work great and stable there are currently some missing functionalities like missing sound, gpio export not possible (no bug report yet as more tests are needed) and posiblly some other bugs too (like no working keyboard in some cases, initrd symlink not updated with kernel upgrade).

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Information

Some hardware features are not yet tested. Like Bluetooth, Wi-Fi, most of the GPIO connector functions.

Install and tests were started with Mageia-8-rpi-aarch64-noDE.img.gz image. Be brave and contribute your helpfull experience.


Raspberry Pi 3 aka RPi3 board

Mageia works stable on RPi3 too. The instructions should work the same as on RPi4. Note that there are only 64 bit images currently available but you can build your own with our scripts.

Raspberry Pi 400

Mageia should work on Raspberry Pi 400 too. The instructions should work the same as on RPi4. Note that there are only 64 bit images currently available but you can build your own with our scripts.

Older Raspberry boards

Boards as Raspberry Pi Zero, and 1 are currently unsupported due to older (ARMv6) architecture. But our scripts can build image for Raspberry Pi 2 (32 bit), Raspberry Pi 3 (32 bit or 64 bit) and even Compute Module other than 1.

How to install and configure Mageia 8 on your Banana Pi board

Mageia 8 can be also installed on Banana Pi board. You can find 32 bit images here and even build your own with our scripts.


Other ARM boards

More experienced can use our scripts to build generic aarch64 image.


First boot

Image without Desktop Environment aka command line interface

  • login name for first boot is root, new password is required
  • Workaround for changing the repositories in CLI (to be done before any urpmi command):
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[root@computer ~]# cat /etc/urpmi/urpmi.cfg # to check to which version URL points
cp /etc/urpmi/urpmi.cfg /etc/urpmi/urpmi_original.cfg # copy, to be on the safe side
sed -i 's/cauldron/8/g' /etc/urpmi/urpmi.cfg # the magic command to change
cat /etc/urpmi/urpmi.cfg # to check the result
  • After you have properly set desired Mageia version (8 in our case) in repositories it's time to refresh the latest packages lists, add your language, set your locale and keyboard and of course add nonroot users.
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[root@computer ~]# urpmi.update -a # refresh or even better

urpmi.update -a && urpmi --auto-select # refresh and udate
urpmi drakconf draklocale # add important parts of mcc
urpmi locales-sl # add your locale if non English, note that Slovenian one is just an example. use <Tab> autocompletion if you don't remember exactly (not strange as there are more than 180).
draklocale # setup your language
drakconf # and tune your keyboard layout and add a nonroot user
hostnamectl set-hostname your_desired_hostname # change default hostname rpi-aarch64 if you wish or need

  • You can install Desktop Environment (GUI aplication can come handy even in headless configuration)
Konsole.png
[root@computer ~]# urpmi task-xfce # for example or slightly thinner task-xfce-minimal

startx # or startxfce4


Image with Desktop Environment

If you use your ARM board with monitor or TV everything should work the same as in your ordinary computer. There's also nice documentation available.